An Interesting Life

Let me tell you a bit about a dude I know in NYC that I’ve never met….

The Man in the Box
His name is David Everitt-Carlson and I first learned of his existence through his Wild Wild East Dailies Blog.

Over the course of his recent life David’s been a senior advertising exec with a Fortune 500 company, owned an ad agency in S. Korea and tried to make it in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Then, at the behest of a lady -why else?, he left Vietnam traveling to Germany, then to Mali for a job that didn’t pan out. So it was off to Paris, then back to Germany, back to Paris, back to Vietnam, finally returning to the place of his birth, NYC.

Since his arrival “home” he’s slept at the old Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital -currently a homeless shelter for men- on E 30th street for two months, joined the “Occupy movement,” appeared in the Wall Street Journal, shown his art as part of the “Up Against It” installation in the Munch Gallery in NYC, written a number of articles for print publications and had a song written about him.

He still writes a bit for his A Homeless Blogger in NYC blog, he’s still looking for gainful employment (contact info), but mostly he’s trying to promote his I Think Outside My Box art gig.

And in case you still think he sounds reasonably normal “for an artist” he once hitchhiked the 600+ plus kilometers from Munich to Amsterdam in the dead of winter to see a Todd Rundgren concert.

It’s an interesting life.

Sigmonster

In keeping with the title of this post. -Something I started several months ago and never finished writing. I’m going to tell you about one of my favorite toys that I haven’t taken out in over a year.

It’s my Sigma 300-800mm. Let’s see, it only weighs 12lbs and is a mere 2ft long.
IMG_1257

It’s capable of taking great photographs but the technique required for getting a decent shot at 800mm is rather exacting because the slightest movement on this end translates into a huge movement out at the far end. This means the use of a remote release, locking the mirror up, learning to drape your arm over the top of the lens without leaning on it or any number of similar methods of dampening any possible vibrations. It also means using a very sturdy tripod and a good stable head.

The real trouble with this beast is that by the time you get the camera, lens, head and tripod assembled you’re humping something over 20lbs. This means that a two mile hike on level ground turns in to a twenty mile uphill trek by the time you decide to pack it in. Especially during the summer months here in Las Vegas when the 85 deg temperature at 6am becomes 100 degrees by 10 and 115 by noon. 🙁

Blue Heron
Blue heron off a monopod -750mm at 50 meters.